Kiseki

On March 11th 2011, at 14:46, a magnitude 9 earthquake hit the northeast coast of Japan, especially Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures. A tsunami subsequently washed away kilometers of Japan’s east coast, taking thousands of lives and severely affecting the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. It forced the authorities to evacuate many villages in the central (Nakadori) and eastern (Hamadori) areas; however, it did not prevent the inhabitants from living with the silent enemy of radiation. More than 160,000 people were forced to leave their homes in the first year, with over 450,000 displaced across the prefecture.

This project begins in 2016 and spans throughout all Fukushima prefecture, covering as the central axes the resilience (回復力 –kaifuku ryoku = “recovery force”) and the future (未来 – mirai). Starting from the situation 5 years after what happened, KISEKI project wants to know resilient stories that connect people. Looking further into the importance of words and terminology in the japanese language, and trying to capture their essence. For this reason, at the previous concepts are added ikigai(生き甲斐 = “reason for life”) and kiseki, whose two readings can be “miracle” (奇跡) and” trajectory “(軌跡) are added to the previous ones in order to complete the circle.

Year:

2016-

Place:

Fukushima

On March 11, 2011, at 14:46, a magnitude 9 earthquake hit the northeast coast of Japan, especially Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures. A tsunami subsequently washed away kilometers of Japan’s east coast, taking thousands of lives and severely affecting the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Forcing the authorities to evacuate many villages in the central (Nakadori) and eastern (Hamadori) areas; however, it did not prevent the inhabitants from living with the silent enemy of radiation. More than 160,000 people were forced to leave their homes in the first year, with over 450,000 displaced across the prefecture.

This project begins in 2016 and runs throughout the prefecture, covering the central axes: resilience (回復力 – kaifuku ryoku = “recovery force”) and the future (未来 – mirai). Starting from the situation 5 years after what happened, KISEKI project wants to know resilient stories that connect people. Looking further into the importance of words and terminology in the japanese language, and trying to capture their essence. For this reason, at the previous concepts are added ikigai(生き甲斐 = “reason for life”) and kiseki, whose two readings can be “miracle” (奇跡) and” trajectory “(軌跡) are added to the previous ones in order to complete the circle.

Year:

2016-

Place:

Fukushima

Date:
Back To Top